Pictures of Dentistry and Dental Procedures

The thousands of pictures on NYCdentist.com have been created for educational purposes
by Dr. Jeffrey Dorfman, Director of The Center for Special Dentistry.

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Gingivectomy, periodontal gum surgery, cutting gums, GV

Click on the small photos below to enlarge.
Image Photo Description
gingivectomy, gum surgery, crown preparation cap, broken cusp fracture Gingivectomy performed during a crown preparation. The distal lingual cusp of this tooth had fractured and the patient ignored it for a while. This caused the overgrowth of the gum in this area.
gingivectomy, distal wedge, pericorium, pericoronitis, periodontal gum surgery, gv Distal wedge procedure - one week post op. This periodontal gum surgery is performed to remove gum tissue - the pericorium - that may grow over the biting surface of the lower back molar. The pericorium in this patient had occasionally resulted in tooth pain infection and required antibiotics.
Gingivectomy, periodontal gum surgery,  cutting gums, removal of gingival tissue  electrosurgery Crown buildup and periodontal gum surgery on a maxillary first molar after removal of tooth decay and root canal therapy. 1) Temporary filling material in the tooth following root canal therapy. 2) Gutta percha exposed in the pulp chamber after removal of the temporary dental filling. Tooth decay is still present. 3) Tooth cavity removal and preparation into the root canal orifices to aid in mechanical retention of the dental bonding composite resin core. 4) Final drilling preparation after gum surgery in the distal section of the tooth.
gingivectomy, cutting gum tissue, gv  periodontal surgery removal cut gingiva how to pictures Crown buildup with gingivectomy - GV. 1) Old composite dental filling. 2) Composite removed, recurrent decay is visible. 3) Pulp chamber with tooth decay cavity still present. 4) Old composite came out in one piece; it was not bonded. 5) Tooth decay removed and prep into canal orifices for bonding retention. 6) Depth of drilling preparation into pulp chamber. 7) Dental bonding is in place before tooth preparation. 8) Tooth preparation and gingivectomy; note the occlusal retention groove.
gingivectomy, cutting gum tissue, gv,  periodontal surgery, gingiva removal how to photos Crown buildup technique with dental bonding into root canal orifices after preparation. Notice dental crown preparation ends on tooth structure.
periodontal surgery Gingivectomy gv  preprosthetic surgery crown lengthening short clinical crowns Short clinical teeth crowns that require crown lengthening gum surgery to increase retention for the maxillary anterior dental bridge. 1) and 2) A three millimeter submarginal incision was made around all the teeth. 3) The gingival collar was removed including the interproximal tissue. 4) The flap was sutured against the underlying bone.
fibroma, gingival papillary hyperplasia pyogenic granuloma gum oral surgery  gingivectomy GV Pyogenic granuloma on the papilla - gum point - between two teeth of a 40-year-old male. The x-rays radiographs revealed no pathology. The soft tissue was firm and did not respond to periodontal scaling. It did not hurt and did not bleed upon probing. Initial diagnosis: irritation fibroma. The tissue was sent for biopsy; the pathology report indicated it was a pyogenic granuloma. Photo 1 of 3.
pyogenic granuloma, fibroma, papilla hyperplasia, gum growing, cutting gums, periodontal surgery Pyogenic granuloma on the papilla between two teeth of a 40-year-old male. The x-rays radiographs did not reveal pathology. The gum tissue was firm and did not respond to root planing and scaling. There was not associated pain and it did not bleed upon probing. Treatment: surgical excision. The tissue was sent for biopsy; the pathology report indicated it was a pyogenic granuloma. Photo 2 of 3.
pyogenic granuloma gingivectomy  fibroma papillary hyperplasia gum gv  overgrowth Pyogenic granuloma on the papilla between two teeth of a 40-year-old male. The radiographs revealed no pathology. The gum tissue was firm and did not respond to scaling and root planing. It did not hurt and did not bleed upon probing. Treatment: surgical site after excision and placement of Coe-pak periodontal wound dressing. The tissue was sent for biopsy; the pathology report indicated it was a pyogenic granuloma. Photo 3 of 3.
gingivectomy Dental Bridge Repair  Resorption Gum Surgery  Electrosurgery  Gingival Margin gv Root Gingivectomy with Dental Bridge repair. The patient wanted to try to save his bridge. 1) X-ray after root canal therapy. The root canal itself did not seem subject to external resorption. 2) Gingivectomy GV. Note the still unusual look of the facial tooth decay. 3) Following tooth decay cavity removal. Note the communication to the gutta percha. 4) The dental bonding restoration. Photo #1 of 2.
gingivectomy gv Teeth Bridge Repair Gingival Margin, gum surgery, cut remove gum tissue Gingivectomy with Dental Bridge repair. The patient wanted to save his dental bridge. 1) Fitting the teeth bridge over the tooth bonding repair. 2) This teeth bridge was cemented with resin cement. The mesial wing was also bonded to the distal of the lateral incisor tooth. 3) The gingivectomy was chosen over a gum surgery flap because the patient had a low lip line and so the development of a pseudopocket with a flap was avoided. The red indicates where the gum line could have been. 4) The final result. The patient is informed of the need for bridge replacement when finances allow. Photo #2 of 2.

 

 Information about these dental photos

     In medicine and dentistry "left" and "right" are based upon the orientation of the patient's body and not how they appear in a photograph of a smile.  For example, a reference to the upper left teeth will actually appear to be on the right side when viewing a picture of the face and similarly an upper right tooth will appear to be on the left side.

     Many words in dentistry like oral and mouth have a similar meaning and are frequently used together to help our readers find specific words they best understand.  This is particularly important because a majority of our visitors are from countries where English is not their primary language.  Maxilla or maxillary refer to the upper jaw.  Mandible or mandibular refer to the lower jaw.

     There are many other similar word combinations used throughout this website because our pages are read by patients and dentists.  A few of the most common are discussed here.  Tooth decay, tooth cavity and dental caries all mean the same thing.  Tooth, teeth and dental are also frequently interchanged as in teeth veneers or dental veneer laminate.  Oral rehabilitation and dental reconstruction mean smile makeover.  The word for x-ray may be used with or without a hyphen (this is true for other words too) and can also be called a radiograph.